Urban Fantasy
Catskinner’s Book

Catskinner’s Book

Making a deal with the devil inside. Literally.

My most gripping reads are almost always the ones where the very premise itself grabs my attention in a choke hold, and such is the case here. Long-time loser James Ozwryck finally has a life: a small apartment, a regular job, and a steady income. There's even plenty of time for video games. It might not be much, but it's his. And to keep it, all he has to do is let a demon borrow his body from time to time. You know, to kill people. It's a pretty sweet deal. 
– Jefferson Smith

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Malus Domestica

Malus Domestica

Small town evil, big city chills.

Most horror stories are lost on me. There are so many buckets of blood being shed by so many barely-glimpsed strangers that nothing resonates. Real horror, to me, is when terrible things happen to people I know and like. Especially if I can clearly see the long, slow, but inevitable arc of their lives sliding straight toward the wood chipper. I loved Hunt's Whirlwind in the Thorn Tree, but would he hold up in horror? Well, it turns out I need not have worried, because the man is no quick-slash artist. He knows enough to give me an early taste of the stakes and then settle in to let me get cozy with the family before bringing out the knives. And the result was chilling. Forget the hags of Eastwick and Oz. If you want your witches to be really scary, put 'em right there in your home town and have them serve cookies to your kids.
– Jefferson
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Rust: Season One

Rust: Season One

Darkly disturbing - the way existential horror should be.

After being pushed in front of the subway, Kimberly Archer finds herself in an impossible town with a husband she's never seen before and a life she can't remember. The rain never stops, the phones don't work and the doctors think she's delusional. And that's on a good day.

Imagine Stephen King siring a love-beast upon the dead and moldering remains of HP Lovecraft. That's Rust. Right from the opening scene that leaves us questioning just what is real and what is not, Ruz plunges us full-screaming into the chaotic afterlife of one Kimberley Archer, who is either single and dead, or living in hell, unable to escape the devoted husband and child she has no memory of ever having met. This one will creep you out completely.
– Jefferson Smith

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